Jackalope has won the award for landscaping in Tourism, as designed by TCL, at the 2019 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects Victorian Chapter Awards.

Set on a private vineyard amid the Mornington Peninsula wine region, Jackalope is the award winning design hotel, featuring 45 designer dens and world class F&B offerings, formed in collaboration with Australia’s preeminent creatives – including TCL, Carr Design Group, and Fabio Ongarato Design.

A personal project of 30-year-old Melbourne-based entrepreneur, Louis Li, the hotel guides guests on a sensory journey of art, design and dining experiences, delivering a decadent interplay between the ideal and the surreal.

Conceived in partnership with some of Australia’s preeminent creatives—including architectural firm Carr Design Group and multi-disciplinary studio, Fabio Ongarato Design—Li has produced an icon of contemporary design.

Jackalope’s 45 rooms comprise 38 sqm ‘Terrace’ or ‘Vineyard View’ categories through to 85 sqm ‘Lairs’. Floor-to-ceiling windows and private terraces connect guests to the rural surrounds and bathrooms boast rain showers, double vanities, bath products made exclusively for the hotel by Hunter Lab, rain showers, and the option of deep-soak, black Japanese tubs.

“Whether a luxury traveller prefers a scenic destination, food, art, evocative design, or to connect with their surrounds, Jackalope sits at the forefront of emerging and established hotel trends,” says Jackalope’s Group General Manager Tracy Atherton, formerly of Aman Resorts and Hotel Hotel.

Perry Lethlean, Director of TCL says, ‘Jackalope hotel is unique in both destination and design, exuding place-driven architecture and landscaping that explores anticipation, nourishment, indulgence and sustenance.

The landscape architecture of Jackalope forms a critical part in the ensemble of experiences – it amplifies the beauty of the site and creates a reverie of indulgence’.

The AILA awards recognise design that support human well being in a variety of sectors from health to tourism and academia, representing places where people and nature coexist.

Source: Jackalope